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Central Italy: hot water in the tub II

italian-hot-tub01

Let me report the wise comment of our client (and friend):
“I am confirmed in the belief that Japanese were thousands of years ahead of us westerners: in the age when we were using perfumes to hide our odors and (in the rare occasions we were washing), we were using underwears and busts to hide our body, japanese were…

…bathing.

Naked. Alone or in good company. Clean in the mind and in the body.”
Also in this case, I cannot but agree…!

new product: hiba oil

hiba-oil

We always receive the same question:

Q. How should I maintain/clean the tub?

The answer is always:

  1. Ensure good ventilation in the bathrom.
  2. You may wipe the tub dry after use if you want.
  3. Never use soap or detergent to clean the tub.
  4. Do nothing, just enjoy the tub.
  5. If you find some stains you may remove them with alcohol or other stain remover – only applied on the spot – rub gently and rinse thoroughly.

The tub needs love and care more than maintenance.
If you use it often (preferably daily), keep an eye on the hygrometer and take care of small stains as soon as you spot them, you tub will have a long and happy life.


Anyway, our clients feel this is not enough. They want to do something. They want to be proactive and show concretely their affection for the tub.

Over the years we tried vegetable base detergents, non-oil oils and ecologic cleaners.
They were sticky or just meaningless and we continued to recommend just – pure love – to take care of the tub.


But yes, we finally found a product we can recommend for cleaning and rehidratating the wood. It is an oil base product from the same line as the ones used for aromatherapy.

See our product page for specific information and use instructions.

Japanese people do not use hiba oil for clenaning wooden bathtubs but it has amazing applications in our everyday life. Here below are some detailed information about Hiba oil:

FIELDS OF USE

  1. MEDICAL:
    Hiba oil is used to prevent nosocomial infections, especially those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).
    It is also used to treat eczema (atopic dermatitis).
  2. SANITARY:
    Hiba oil is used together with Squalane (a natural moisturizing factor) in soap and shampoos particularly indicated for delicate skins.
    Hiba water (a byproduct of the distillation of hiba oil) is used as a fragrance in bathing salts.
  3. AGRICULTURE:
  4. Hiba oil is used to prevent plant diseases originated by mold (wood moulder disease, root rot disease etc.).
    In apiculture is used with good reasult to prevent and fight chalk disease (Ascospharera apis)
  5. FOOD PRESERVATION:
    Hiba oil is used for conservation of fresh (not frozen) melon, strawberry, mushrooms.
    It is also used as a natural flavouring agent for candies and other foods.

PROPERTIES

  1. BACTERICIDAL:
    It prevents conditions for the development of mold and fungi.
    Hiba oil has a wide spectrum of action against many different families of bacteria and is especially effective to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
  2. MIND STABILITY:
    Hiba oil has a proven relaxative qualities. Stress relief has been laboratory tested on Guinea pigs.
  3. INSECTICIDE:
    Hiba oil has an insecticidal action against thermites and cockroaches. It is also used as an insect repellent against fleas and mites.
  4. DEODORANT:
    Hiba oil smoothes strong smells.
    It is specially effective against smells originated by body activity (ammonia, aminoacid base).

hinoki lumber for surrey

We were requested to supply hinoki timber (rough saw cut) to be used by the local joinery to build doors and furniture. At first we offered a quote in cultivated hinoki from Yoshino (Nara Prefecture).
But – HEY! – the client required all the wood to be quarter sawn to match the coordinated bathtub color and grain.

We checked our stock and asked all our dealers and acquaintances but it is difficult to obtain such quantity of natural timber of such quality and knotless on 4 sides…!

Finally we agreed on a smart solution. We were provided a detailed order of all the small pieces and parts needed for construction. This allowed us to better optimize small cuts we had and to be able to offer better lumber for a much – much lower cost.
Each piece was marked with a number which refers to a detailed list and to the drawings.

It was hard work, but when the reasult is so satisfactory, we forget all the fatigue.

Wood bath-tub installed in Prague

hinoki ofuro

Our client was so kind to send us the photo of installed asnaro bathtub so we are glad to publish it here!
The asnaro wood paneling creates a warm atmosphere, a kind of “other world”, a natural corner.

I am sure here you can forget the cold of central european winters and re-energize body and mind…

I think the local contractor made a great job and the spout was partially recessed inside the wall as planned. Afterall no matter how our cultures may be different, working with wood and loving wood is definately a common heritage.

wabi sabi (II) – tub setting

The tub has been mounted, around is a wide hinoki duckboard.
The stone floor, the ceiling beams…
I can see everywhere passionate details and feel a magic atmosphere…
I am really overwhelmed by the emotions looking at these pictures.
It is central Italy but really feels like Edo period Japan. This is not just because the materials are original, but because the spirit, the concept of the project is authentic.
http://bartokdesign.com/wp-admin/options-reading.php
In the end, when man respects nature and put care and love in his acts, even different cultures touch and become one. I am sure that people entering in this ofuro will understand something more of the real essence of humanity.

packing the tub

Here we are packaging a tub to be shipped by ocean freight.
* One layer of polyethylene sheet to prevent dehidratation and dirt.
* Solid veneer construction for the custom crate to avoid the need for fumigation or (time consuming) custom inspections/quarantine.
Luckily we did not have any problem or damage claim at all so far.

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