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flooring for Singapore house

We were contacted by an architect renovating his home in Singapore.
The client was keen on hinoki material but did not like the traditional “white-pink melange” look of japanese evergreens.
After considering several options, the client opted for a more expensive “all heartwood” material.
The sapwood is eliminated before sawing and milling the planks so the color is more uniform and the lumber itself is harder.
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We milled a tongue and grove on the long sides but did not manufacture the end matching joint (the planks would have become about 4cm shorter and would not fit the module of the project)
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Also, we were requested not to bevel the edges. Our grumpy carpenter was quite uneasy about this (eliminating the corners make the flooring look more regular and prevents indenting of the edges during installation)
But we agreed that everybody would manipulate and install the planks with the utmost care and were able to manufacture the custom “perfectly flat” product.
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The specs/sizes of the flooring are:
material: hinoki (Yoshino-Nara pref.) all heartwood
size: 2000mm x 150mm x 15mm.

I am looking forward to seeing the completed room!
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ofuro for Cape Town -4- completed!

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This is the second ofuro we are shipping to South Africa in 2016!
In both cases we were in touch with the clients, architects and interior designers for over a year but it was worth it! Take a look also at the pictures of the manufacture phases:
part 1part 2part3

Here is the photo of the back side.
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We created a new type of overflow cut: it is tuck in the back towards the wall and is drawing the water to a gutter running along the wall.
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The spout cover is openable for controlling the built in tap. Not a high tech solution but very practical!
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Here is the layout of the whole composition including a duck-board and bench cut with an angle to match the corner of the bathroom. I am looking forward to seeing the completed space!
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Here are the specs of the project:
Material: Asnaro wood AB grade bathtub (quarter sawn) t42mm
Size: L1500mm x W750 x H670mm (ext. dim.) – depth 543mm
Details: copper apron, wood dowels. Iron brand at front side top-right
Option: overflow top cut
Accessories:
* Ledge and filler: W165 x L1500 x H670) assembly on site
* Bench: W 454/367 x D 515 x H 450mm
* Duckboard: W 521/454 x D 400 x H 55mm
* Asnaro wood ledge mounted spout D with faucet

ofuro for Cape Town -3- manufacture

This is sequel of the manufacture of the tub for South Africa.
for those who missed it check in a separate window part 1part 2

So, the planks have been laminated and the edges trimmed (you can see on the wall a plank before being rectified)

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The tongue and grove joint is hand made with a handsaw and chisel. To see the process and understand the way the japanese ofuro water-tightness is assured, refer to the second video from the top in our media section
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3 faces have been assembled together. Now is time to insert the bottom plank. Finally, the last wall will be hand-planed on both sides before being set in place and close the circle.
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You can see here the geometry of the traditional “Tjoint”
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To tighten up the faces, we use long stainless steel bolts. The head of the bolts is capped with round wooden dowels (for a natural look) or copper plates (the traditional detail of the Edo area, borrowed from the ship building practices).
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ofuro for Cape Town -2- start work

Continues from a previous post. Open the blog about “choosing the lumber” in a separate window.

We have been contacted by a private client in South Africa about 3 years ago.
He was going to build a new house overlooking the sea and wanted a japanese bathtub.
Apparently it took more than expected for the permits and to start construction but he got back to us and placed the order. We have a comfortable time frame but since we will ship by ocean freight we started construction:
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First the planks are planed

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Then the material to compose the side walls is selected also considering the grain direction (both to avoid warping and for the aesthetic balance)

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Then thru-holes are opened in the sections of the planks

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and the different parts are composed together with the aid of wood dowels and waterproof glue (only on the matching sections)

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The laminated side walls are pressed and left to rest for few days to dry and stabilize

<will continue…>

hinoki flooring for indonesia

This time we shipped a large quantity of hinoki flooring to indonesia.
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The planks have a end match joint.

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We also shipped waterproofing treatment to be applied after installation.
One large can of “kihada ichiban” contains 16Kg and can cover 100m2.
The cost is 100,000JPY + packaging + shipping.
We also can sell 1L, 4L bins.

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Specs for the project:
– Hinoki flooring-
Origin: Kumano (Mie Pref.)
Quality: one face knotless
Cut: ITAME (plank cut)
Finish: planer finish, no coating, tongue/groove edge, end match
Sizes: W120mm x t 12mm x L 2950mm:

hinoki flooring for your projects!

Maybe not all of you know that we can also supply hinoki wood for flooring or wainscoting?
For interior products (wood not used in wet areas) we use trees from man planted forests (Mainly Kumano area in Mie prefecture and Yoshino area in Nara prefecture.)
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They are very regular and have few knots so we can obtain high quality solid flooring for a reasonable price.
The peculiarity of the material is a mix of “shirata”(sapwood=white) and “akami”(heartwood=red) areas.
The lumber is cut parallel to one direction (plank cut) so the planks are mixed by nature.

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Some people like this look, peculiar of sugi pine and japanese hinoki.
Anyway, if you prefer a more uniform look, the only way to obtain material of the same color is to cut away the sap wood and use only the core of each trunk. This brings up the cost by about 50%.

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Hinoki flooring is used without shoes and is normally un-coated. It is possible to coat it with urethane but this would interfere with two of the nice features of hinoki flooring: the subtle cedar aroma and the soft/warm touch. To make the upkeep easier, we recommend the application of a full penetration water repellent (Kihada ichiban). The product is applied after installation of the flooring so we will supply separately the cans and you will apply on site with a wide brush in 2 coats.

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All the flooring is manufactured as per your order so you can choose the thickness (usually 12, 15 or 18mm), the width (90, 105, 120, 150, 180mm or custom) and length of the planks(2m,3m,4m or custom), the quality and type of processing (tongue/groove, end matching joints, mitered joints, width of bevel etc.)

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plank with tongue and groove + end matching joint

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Here is a reference of sizes/prices in case of 12mm thick material.
The prices are for a minimum quantity of 50m2 or more.

Origin: Kumano (Mie Pref.)
Quality: surface knotless
Cut: ITAME (plank cut)
Finish: planer finish, no coating, tongue/groove edge, end match
thickness: 12mm
w120 x L 1950: @3,020 JPY per piece
w120 x L 2950: @3,950 JPY per piece
w120 x L 3950: @7,000 JPY per piece

w150 x L 1950: @4,000 JPY per piece
w150 x L 2950: @5,900 JPY per piece
w150 x L 3950: @9,200 JPY per piece

The best cost/performance for a 12mm flooring is obtained by using the 3m planks.

For installation use both glue and nails following the procedure as per the sketch here below.
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Hammer the nails diagonally and make them flush with the aid of a punch before laying down the next plank. Proceed until you reach the other end. It is recommended to tuck in the planks with the aid of a hammer to make sure there is no gap between the joints.

NOTE: Solid hinoki flooring is not compatible with floor heating.

Accounting for “save & relocate japanese homes” activity

As promised, here below is the balance sheet for the activity of relocating japanese historic homes.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/191R52WReEc7nonFc3QVEQIuDnEvK64ipfQ4XMKdO9G8/edit?usp=sharing

I did not make the final decision but I think the new activity will be called Japanese Historic Homes and will have a dedicated homepage.

I was (wisely!) advised that if I want to produce concrete results, I should appeal to those interested in owning a japanese home rather than just hoping to find philanthropists with deep pockets and the mission of preserving for posterity as many buildings and environments of value as possible…

“I love your idea of establishing a network to try and preserve more heritage buildings. As far as naming goes I would shy away from “save-japan.org” as this sounds like it could be connected to Fukushima or some other existing cause.
I personally think you need to appeal to those folks who wish to OWN a heritage Japanese home rather than those that wish to SAVE a heritage home, as the former has the means (money) to buy.
Something like Japan-Historic-Homes.org may work. This may facilitate easy web searches. “Heritage” is arguably a more correct word to use but I think some folks may get this confused with modern homes which have a “Heritage style”. “Historic” (or
“Historical”) does sound a bit dry and perhaps over-important, but everyone who looks at the site name will conclude that you mean old, beautiful homes of significance. Anyway, this is just a first effort. I would be very happy to help you further in any way I can.”

So please be in touch and let me know your opinion as well!

All the Best//

iacopo

demolition work almost completed for the fujisawa teahouse

We are sad to see it go but are looking forward to seeing it rebuilt in full glory in Chiba prefecture next year.
It is a big shock for the building but imagine it is like a life saving surgery.
It is painful but all dismantling work was done gently to preserve all the parts.
I cannot imagine this jewel left prey of the bulldozers…

Please find the full photo reportage here:
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.987206494691338.1073741833.168006413278021&type=3

ugly website

Let me publish here the exchange of correspondence I had with a previous customer.
The mail came like a bolt from the blue:

Customer:
> hi
> how is it possible that you sell such expensive high quality baths and
> live in a high tech environment…but your website is so unpractical and
> ugly?
> it stops me from really searching, thats not good pr!
> greetz
> (signature)
> fan of wooden baths
> owner of one.


Dear (customer),

Thank you for your honest comment.
I think you are 100% right.
Actually I am in the process of renovating the HP but it is taking more
time than anticipated.

Please bear with us one more month!

Best//

Bartok design Japan Co.
Manager: Iacopo Torrini
—————————-
e-mail: japan@bartokdesign.com
tel: +81-78-262-6811
fax: +81-78-262-7151
cell.: +81-90-8205-1200
—————————-


ok, accepted!

Sorry for the direct comment, I am Dutch and people from Holland are known for their directness. The difference with southern countries is already big, so you can imagine how it is in Japan

I will visit Japan within 1-2 years, I am interested in japanese woodworkingskills.
Is your business to be visited? Would be nice.

I will be mainly in Nasu (Tochigi) but who knows…
When my current bath will be rotten I defenitely want another ofuro, because it ads a lot of well beinig to my life, using such a bath.

greetings

(signature)


Well I must apologize with all of you as well for the old and non-smartphone optimized HP but, as I said above, YES! the site is under renovation.
It will come also with enhanced web-shop functions and I plan to offer you a heftier slice of Japan, including “karakami” ricepaper, “urushi” lacquer and more!
O tanoshimi-ni ~~

Meanwhile please feel free to send me your bolts… Any comment is appreciated especially if it is helping me improving the service.

All the Best//

iacopo torrini

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